Friday, December 4

Latest Wisconsin news, sports, business and entertainment at 3:20 a.m. CDT


VIRUS OUTBREAK-WISCONSIN

Wisconsin reports 957 new confirmed COVID cases, 1 new death

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Wisconsin health officials report 957 more confirmed cases of the coronavirus and one new death. As of Sunday, the Wisconsin Department of Health Services reports 48,827 people have tested positive for the virus in the state since the pandemic began. The newly reported death raises Wisconsin’s death toll to 892. The Green Bay Press-Gazette reports a total of 312 patients were in Wisconsin hospitals with known cases of the virus as of Sunday. That’s 19 fewer than last Sunday. Of those patients, 60 were in intensive care, according to the Wisconsin Hospital Association.

TODDLER FATALLY SHOT

Milwaukee woman charged in fatal shooting of daughter

MILWAUKEE (AP) — A Milwaukee woman is charged in the shooting death of her 2-year-old daughter last week. The Milwaukee County District Attorney’s office on Sunday charged 22-year-old Jasmine Daniels with first-degree reckless homicide. Zymeiia Stevens was fatally shot Tuesday night. The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports that according to the criminal complaint, Daniels gave conflicting statements to investigators but later acknowledged she “accidentally did it” while “playing around with her gun in the basement when the gun went off and shot” the child. An autopsy found the child suffered four gunshot wounds caused by a single bullet. Daniels is scheduled to make her initial court appearance on Aug. 4.

DOUBLE DROWNING

2 Beloit men die in apparent drowning in subdivision pond

AFTON, Wis. (AP) — Authorities say two Beloit men are dead after they apparently drowned while swimming in a pond in a subdivision near Afton over the weekend. The Rock County Sheriff’s Office says the Janesville Fire Department and town of Beloit police responded to witness reports of two men who “went underwater in distress” and never resurfaced while swimming Saturday afternoon at a spring-fed pond at a subdivision. The Janesville Gazette reports rescuers pulled the two men from the pond and tried to resuscitate them, but they were pronounced dead at a hospital. The men were 22 and 23 years old. Their names have not been released. It’s unclear how long the men were underwater before rescuers found them.

AP-US-RACIAL-INJUSTICE-POLICE-IN-SCHOOLS-

Fight for police-free schools has been years in the making

PHOENIX (AP) — The nationwide shift to eliminate officers from schools has been years in the making. The movement led by students who say they feel unsafe with police on campus got new momentum after George Floyd’s death stirred a national reckoning over racist policing. Black students are twice as likely to get arrested or referred to law enforcement as white students. Students of color are also more likely to attend a campus with a school resource officer. After years of protests, the school board in Madison, Wisconsin, joined cities like Minneapolis, Phoenix, Denver and Portland, Oregon, in ending school contracts with police.  

TRUMP-LAW ENFORCEMENT-MILWAUKEE

Prosecutor: Agents headed to Milwaukee won’t police protests

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — The U.S. attorney for Milwaukee is stressing that additional federal agents being sent to Milwaukee by President Donald Trump will help local and state law enforcement solve violent crimes, not break up protests. Matt Krueger told reporters during a video conference Friday the agents’ mission is to help solve violent crimes, not to patrol the streets. He says he spent Thursday explaining the mission to local authorities. Trump announced Thursday that he was sending federal agents to a number of U.S. cities, including Milwaukee, to combat violent crime. Democrats have blasted the decision, pointing to how federal agents have recently been accused of using excessive force against protesters in Portland, Oregon.

ELECTION 2020-VOTE BY MAIL-SPENDING

Wealthy donors pour millions into fight over mail-in voting

WASHINGTON (AP) — Deep-pocketed and often anonymous donors are pouring over $100 million into an intensifying dispute about whether it should be easier to vote by mail. In Wisconsin, cities have received $6.3 million from an organization with ties to left-leaning philanthropy to help expand vote by mail. Meanwhile, a well-funded conservative group best known for its focus on judicial appointments is spending heavily to fight cases related to mail-in balloting procedures in court. The massive effort is remarkable considering the practice has long been noncontroversial. But the coronavirus is forcing changes to the way states conduct elections and prompting activists across the political spectrum to seek an advantage.

VIRUS OUTBREAK-MASK THREATS

Green Bay officials threatened after passing mask mandate

GREEN BAY, Wis. (AP) — Green Bay police are investigating threats made against city officials over a new mandate requiring face coverings in public buildings because of the coronavirus. Alderman Randy Scannell, who first proposed the mask ordinance, says one email called him a traitor who must die and that the sender would make sure Scannell would die. Police Chief Andrew Smith said all 12 council members, regardless of how they voted on the ordinance, received at least one of the threats. Smith emailed all city officials, telling them to be vigilant. The council spent close to six hours taking public comments and deliberating the ordinance before passing on a 7-5 vote Tuesday night. 

DEER HUNT

DNR board will reconsider deer hunt amid meeting allegations

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — The state Department of Natural Resources board is set to reconsider changes it made to the fall deer hunt framework amid allegations of open meeting violations. Three former board members filed a complaint this month alleging that current Chairman Fred Prehn and current members Greg Kazmierzski, Terry Hilgenberg and Bill Bruins shared a plan to reduce quotas in 11 counties between themselves in a walking quorum, a violation of the state’s open meeting laws. The board approved the plan 5-2 during a meeting June 24. The board now plans to hold a special meeting next Thursday to reconsider the vote.

Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.



Source link